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The Last Days of the Confederacy

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The month of April 1865 is arguably the most important month in the history of the United States of America. The four-year-long Civil War was coming to a close and President Lincoln was eager for the country to begin to heal itself. But before the healing could begin the last of the Confederate forces around the country would need to be disbanded or destroyed. In Virginia, Ulysses S. Grant and the Union Army had Robert E. Lee and what remained of the Rebels surrounded at small village called Appomattox Court House.

Ghostly mirage of Confederate reenactors as they march away from their stacked rifles during the surrender ceremony at Appomattox Court House, Virginia 2015

Ghostly mirage of Confederate reenactors as they march away from their stacked rifles during the surrender ceremony at Appomattox Court House

On April 9th 1865, Lee would surrender himself and the Confederate Army to Grant at Appomattox ending the Civil War in Virginia. But the signing of the surrender at Appomattox was not the end of the war. In North Carolina, as well as other parts of the south, Union and Confederate troops were still engaged in fighting and it would take another month before the conflict would finally reach its end. During this critical and uncertain time for the country the President would be assassinated and jeopardize the lasting peace Lincoln had hoped for in the wars’ aftermath.

In 2015 the National Park Service hosted a week-long commemoration of the Confederate surrender at Appomattox Court House Historical Park. Inviting descendants of Union and Confederate veterans to march in their own commemorative parade thousands of Americans attended the ceremonies where reenactors in Confederate grey stacked their rifles and folded up their battle flags once again under the respectful eyes of their Union hosts in blue.

Click the link below to see the images and story about the Confederate surrenders at Appomattox, Virginia and Bennett Place in Durham, North Carolina.

The Last Days of the Confederacy

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